12.29.2015

Documentation of Regular Features on Social Media

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Mostly for my own documentation's sake, here's a list of regular blog features and Twitter hashtags that have become a recurring feature in my social media production:

Time and money.  An every-other-year accounting of my allocation of time and money.

Car usage.  An annual tally of how many times I drove or was driven in a car.

April Fools.  My feeble attempts to trick my readers.

Predictions.  A fun end-of-year stab at what will happen in the coming year (as well as a pitiful recounting of how last year's guesses were woefully off).

New Year's resolutions.  A blow-by-blow review of how I did on my resolutions for the year.

Eco-friendly holiday greetings from the Huang Family.  A holiday "card" from all of us, without having to send them in the mail.

What am I working on.  A quarterly description of work projects I'm working on.

Recommended reads.  Blurbs on selected book reads from the past three months.

Huang Family newsletter.  A monthly update on our family.

Too long for a tweet, too short for a blog.  Periodic sharings of excerpts from a book/magazine/song I've recently consumed, presented without commentary.

Lazy linking.  A periodic dump of links to articles I found interesting.

#TBT.  Every Thursday, I post a song lyric and invite others to guess the title and riff on what memories it conjures up.

#1stWorldDadProblems.  Not serious whinings that betray just how good I have it as a father in America.

#ThisIsWestPhilly.  Something about my neighborhood that captures its quirkiness; usually having to do with some juxtaposition that you wouldn't find in many other neighborhoods in the US.

#FitBitOrgasm.  I've rigged my FitBit, through IFTTT, so that when it reaches my step goal (and vibrates...hence the phrase "FitBitOrgasm"), a tweet is automatically sent out that records the date and step count.

#OverheardFromTheFuture.  Wild guesses at the kinds of innovations that will be commonplace in the future but seem futuristic now.

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